Sound Effects

Synchronization And Transfers–Videos

Posted on October 8, 2010. Filed under: Audio, Law, Radio, Recordings, Sound, Sound Effects, Speech, Synchronization, Web | Tags: , , , , , , |

 

Midi Time Code & SMPTE Synchronization for Midi Composers

How to Synchronize Audio and Video

How to Make a Good Basic YouTube Video

Cheap Wireless Radio Mics From eBay – any good?

Radio Mics & Alternatives for Low Budget Filmmaking?

Main Points To Remember

1. Synchronization allows the locking of two or more devices that have microprocessor intelligence so that they operate at precisely the same rate.

2. Accurate synchronization requires a system to code the recording media as well as a synchronizer to read the codes, compare them, and adjust the positions and speeds of machine transports so that they run at exactly the same rate.

3. There are three basic time codes: longitudinal time code and vertical interval time code, both of which are forms of  SMPTE time code; MIDI time codes; and the IEC standard.

4. SMPTE time code is a high-frequency electronic digital signal consisting of a stream of pulses produced by a time code generator. Its identifying code numbers are broken down into hours, minutes, seconds, and frames.

5. SMPTE longitudinal time code (LTC) is a digital signal converted to audio frequencies so it can be recorded on an audio track.

6. Vertical interval time code (VITC) carries the same information as SMPTE code, but it is used with video-tape and encodes the information vertically within the video signal, outside the visible picture area.

7. MIDI time code (MTC) translates SMPTE time code into MIDI messages.

8. The IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) standard is the time code system used in digital audio-cassette recorders to ensure compatibility among all R-DAT equipment.

9. Because all time code readouts are in the same form, it is easy to confuse them if any numbers are duplicated on the same tape or on multiple tapes in a production. Two ways to avoid this confusion are to use the zero-start or the time-of-day logging method.

10. In recording SMPTE time code, be careful to record it at the recommended level. It the signal is recorded at too low a level, synchronization is adversely affected. If it is recorded  at too high a level, the time code signal will distort.

11. Every digital audio system has a signal, known as a word clock, generated inside the device that controls sampling frequency, or sampling rate. With digital audio, sampling rate is the determining syn factor.

12. A degradation in word-clock signals among the digital devices being interfaced can create jitter–a variation in time from sample to sample that causes changes in the shape of the audio waveform.

13. Five frame rate standards are used within SMPTE time code: 23.976, 24, 25, 29.97, and 30 frames per second (fps).

14. Frame rates for television are in either drop frame or non-drop frame format. Drop frame time code is time-accurate because it makes up for the error that results from the difference between the 29.97-fps and the 30-fps rate of video. Non-drop frame is the original video time code calculated at 30 fps. The two modes are not interchangeable.

15. In double-system recording, sound and picture are recorded separately and in syn; the camera records the picture, and an audio recorder handles the sound.

16. In single-system recording, both sound and picture are recorded on the same medium.

17. Two methods used to synchronize the film camera and the audio recorder in double-system recording are crystal synchronization and time code synchronization.

18. In double-system recording, a clapslate is used to make a visible and an audible syn mark on the film and audio recording, respectively. This helps identify and synchronize scenes during their transfer from the audio recoding to magnetic film, or more common, hard disk, and in editing.

19. Time code permits the accurate interlocking of two or more recorders, but a synchronizer is necessary to ensure that their transports run together simultaneously.

20. Copying sound (or picture) from one audio film or video device to another is usually called a transfer. Dub is another often-used term to describe this process.

21. Common audio transfers are analog to analog, analog to digital, and digital to digital.

22. In transferring audio, the sound can be altered for special effects.

23. The process of transferring a double-system film recording for postproduction to align the audio and the film is called resolving.

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Sound Design–Videos

Posted on October 8, 2010. Filed under: Audio, Communications, Digital Communication, Movies, Music, Radio, Recordings, Sound Effects, Speech | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

WALL-E Special Features Animation Sound Design: Building Worlds From The Sound Up (Part 1)

WALL-E Special Features Animation Sound Design: Building Worlds From The Sound Up (Part 2)

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 1 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 2 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 3 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 4 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 5 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 6 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 7 of 7

A Tour of LA’s Village Recording Studio

Deep Recording Studios – The Tour

Deep Studios Industry Training – Sound Engineering

Main Points To Remember

1. Sound design is the process of creating the overall sonic character of a production and is ongoing throughout the production process.

2. The sound designer is responsible for creative control of the audio–to put a coherent sonic stamp on a production–although all members of the audio team make creative contributions to the sound.

3. There are three domains to work with in creating a sound design: speech, sound effects, and music. Paradoxically, silence and the ability of sound to evoke a picture in the mind’s eye may be considered two other domains.

4. All sound is made up of the same basic components: pitch, loudness, timbre, tempo, rhythm, attack, duration, and decay.

5. Sound also has a visual component in that it can create pictures in the “theater of the mind.”

6. Sound has several functions in relation to picture; Sound can parallel picture, sound can define picture, picture can define sound and picture can define effect, and sound can counterpoint picture.

7. There  is no set procedure for designing sound. At the outset the most important thing to do is study the script and analyze the auditory requirements line by line to determine the overall sonic approach to various scenes or for an entire work, or both.

8. Determining a sound design involves consideration of how the audience is to think or feel about a particular story, scene, character, or action; from what point of view; and whether that is to be carried out mainly in the sound effects or music or both.

9. Determining a sound design also requires the awareness that doing so is often tantamount to defining a production’s conceptual and emotional intent.

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