Speech

News Journal: Number 35, December 1, 2010: The Audacity of Grope: A TSA Exposé–Progressive Pervert Petulent Prevaricating President–Must View Video!

Posted on December 1, 2010. Filed under: Communications, Democratic Party, Digital Communication, Ethical Practices, Ethics, Issues, Law, Mass Media, News, Newspapers, Policies, Political Parties, Politics, Print Media, Public Relations, Radio, Recordings, Republican Party, Society, Speech, Television, Web | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Campaign for Liberty launches a public relations campaign against President Obama’s TSA government interventionism:

“…Got questions about the TSA? This video’s got answers. Jam-packed with all the information you need to get up to speed on the 2010 holiday airport security uproar. Get the inside scoop on full body scanners, radiation health risks, pat-downs, screw-ups, underwear bombers, cavity searches, special interests, government officials, the Constitution (specifically, the 4th Amendment), scanner storage capability, and hear from some of the most engaged minds in the debate; including Congressman Ron Paul…”

Campaign for Liberty Mission Statement

“Our mission is to promote and defend the great American principles of individual liberty, constitutional government, sound money, free markets, and a noninterventionist foreign policy, by means of educational and political activity.”

http://www.campaignforliberty.com/about.php

http://www.youtube.com/user/campaignforliberty

One point that the above video failed to address is the spread of disease as a direct result of the TSA not changing their blue gloves after each pat down.

Instead the TSA screeners use the same pair of blue gloves most of the day.

Imagine going to a doctor or dentist who wore the same blue gloves while examining many patients during the day.

An unintended consequence of the government grope will be the spread of the various influenza (flu) viruses.

The time has come to stop this security theater nonsense and start profiling passengers and targeting individuals that are more likely to be terrorist bombers.

Flawless Airline Security on Israeli Planes

TSA: Enemy of the American People?

Ron Paul: TSA Has Gone too Far

Enough is enough.

Terminate the TSA peepers and pat downs.

President Obama responds:

President Obama explains the new TSA Airport Security Screenings

Wink

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News Journal: Number 31, November 3, 2010: Tea Party Tidal Wave Falls and Rises–Videos

Posted on November 3, 2010. Filed under: Books, Issues, Law, News, Newspapers, Politics, Print Media, Radio, Society, Speech, Web | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The tea party movement supported many candidates for public office in the 2010 elections.

Some lost and some won.

One candidate for public office had a record of failure if you believed the press and lost several races for public office in the past.

The person lost his job.

The person failed in business.

The person lost a state representative race.

The person had a nervous breakdown.

The person lost a state house speaker race.

The person lost a U.S. Senate race.

The person lost the nomination to be U.S. Vice President.

The person lost again a U.S. Senate race.

The person finally ran for President of the United States.

The person won.

Abraham Lincoln, one of America’s most respected Presidents was the first Republican President of the United States.

 One tea party supported candidate who lost for a second time a U.S. Senate race was Christine O’Donnell of Delaware.

Tea Party Favorite Christine O’Donnell

O’Donnell’s Internal Opposition

Delaware is a very liberal state where union endorsements and support play a big role in determining who wins a state-wide election.

Delaware’s Senator for 36 years had been Joe Biden, the current Vice-President of the United States.

Christine O’Donnell lost the U.S. Senate race in 2008 against Senator Biden who was running for both Senator and Vice-President of the United States.

Christine O’Donnell lost again the U.S. Senate race in 2010.

Character and integrity matter and ideas have consequences.

A person with character and integrity and the right ideas does not always win a political race.

Christine O’Donnell has character and integrity and the right ideas.

Like Abraham Lincoln, I do not believe the American people have heard the last from Christine O’Donnell.

Many tea party movement supported candidates did win the privilege of governing their state and to represent the citizens of their state in Congress and the Senate.

Four standout.

Vicky Hartzler: A Friend to Small Business in Congress

Rand Paul: ‘It’s a Tea Party Tidal Wave’

REPLAY: Marco Rubio acceptance speech

NIKKI HALEY (R-SC)

NIKKI HALEY (R-SC) on HANNITY GOP Gubernatorial Candidate

Vicky Hartler was elected to represent Missouri’s 4th District in the United States House of Representatives.

Rand Paul was elected to represent Kentucky as Senator in the United States Senate.

Marco Rubio was elected to represent Florida as Senator in the United States Senate.

Nikki Halley was elected to govern South Carolina as Governor.

All four favor limited Constitutional government, balanced budgets, lower taxes, less regulation, capitalism and a free market place.

The Founding Fathers were men of character and integrity and knew that ideas have consequences.

The Founding Fathers–Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Franklin and others– gave the American people the benefit of their wisdom contained in The Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution.

The Founding Fathers gift to the American people was a representative republic with separation of powers and a system of checks and balances.

On Tuesday the American people elected a few of their fellow citizens to represent them in Congress and the Senate and govern their states.

The tea party movement goes to Washington and will have its own caucus in the House and Senate.

Rand Paul on Tea Party’s Future

Only time will tell whether the American people choose wisely.

Background Articles and Videos

Tea party candidates win in Fla., Ky.; lose Del.

“…Two tea party champions won high-profile Senate elections Tuesday, spearheading a likely cadre of libertarian-leaning Republicans who will press party leaders to be more adamant about lower taxes, less spending and smaller government.

Rand Paul of Kentucky and Marco Rubio of Florida rocked the GOP establishment last spring by routing leadership favorites in party primaries. Then they beat back Democrats’ efforts to paint them as too extreme, winning comfortably on Tuesday. However, another well-publicized tea party darling, Christine O’Donnell of Delaware, lost to Democrat Chris Coons. She also won a stunning GOP primary victory, beating longtime Rep. Mike Castle, but she failed to extend her popularity to the broader November electorate. …”

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101103/ap_on_el_se/us_senate_14

“…List of Lincoln’s failures

A common list of the failures of Abraham Lincoln (along with a few successes) is:

  • 1831 – Lost his job
  • 1832 – Defeated in run for Illinois State Legislature
  • 1833 – Failed in business
  • 1834 – Elected to Illinois State Legislature (success)
  • 1835 – Sweetheart died
  • 1836 – Had nervous breakdown
  • 1838 – Defeated in run for Illinois House Speaker
  • 1843 – Defeated in run for nomination for U.S. Congress
  • 1846 – Elected to Congress (success)
  • 1848 – Lost re-nomination
  • 1849 – Rejected for land officer position
  • 1854 – Defeated in run for U.S. Senate
  • 1856 – Defeated in run for nomination for Vice President
  • 1858 – Again defeated in run for U.S. Senate
  • 1860 – Elected President (success)

That looks like a pretty glum résumé, making you wonder how he ever made it to the top. But when you really think of it, to run for office or high positions so many times, you have to have something on the ball and have more successes than meet the eye. …”

http://www.school-for-champions.com/history/lincoln_failures.htm

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News Journal: Number 27, October 16, 2010: Cracking Communist Chinese Currency–Float The Yuan/RBN or Devalue Your Currency Via U.S. Dollar 10% Per Year For Next Five Years Or Face U.S. Import Ban–No Pressure–Your Choice–Videos

Posted on October 16, 2010. Filed under: Globalization, International Trade, Issues, News, Politics, Print Media, Speech | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

“The valuation of the monetary unit depends not upon the wealth of the country, but upon the ratio between the quantity of money and the demand for it, so that even the richest country may have a bad currency and the poorest country a good one.”

~Ludwig von Mises, The Theory of Money and Credit, page 278.

“The peculiar character of the problem of a rational economic order is determined precisely by the fact that the knowledge of the circumstances of which we must make use never exists in concentrated or integrated form but solely as the dispersed bits of incomplete and frequently contradictory knowledge which all the separate individuals possess. The economic problem of society is thus not merely a problem of how to allocate “given” resources—if “given” is taken to mean given to a single mind which deliberately solves the problem set by these “data.” It is rather a problem of how to secure the best use of resources known to any of the members of society, for ends whose relative importance only these individuals know. Or, to put it briefly, it is a problem of the utilization of knowledge which is not given to anyone in its totality.”

~Friedrich A. Hayek, The Use of Knowledge in Society

September, 1945, American Economic Review. XXXV, No. 4. pp. 519-30. American Economic Association

http://www.econlib.org/library/Essays/hykKnw1.html

Capitalism in China: Should We Trade With Them? – Ayn Rand Center for Individual Rights

Dr. Milton Friedman speaking about Free Trade

The looming China-U.S. showdown

Battling over the Yuan – F24 101001

China’s Wen Jiabao: ‘Dont pressure us to raise RMB rates’

Lee Says China Will Appreciate Yuan to Prevent Trade War: Video

Eurozone troika urges ‘broad-based’ currency appreciation in China

Inside Look: China Currency Controversy

China Currency and Trade Wars

Peter Schiff – June 21 2010 – Appreciation Of The Chinese Currency Means The Implosion Of The Dollar

Mar 24 10 Hearing on China’s Exchange Rate Policy, Niall Ferguson Opening Statement

Mar 24 10 Hearing on China’s Exchange Rate Policy, C. Fred Bergsten Opening Statement

Mar 24 10 Hearing on China’s Exchange Rate Policy, Clyde Prestowitz Opening Statement

Mar 24 10 Hearing on China’s Exchange Rate Policy, Philip Levy Opening Statement

The U.S. and China (Ted Galen Carpenter)

Government intervention into markets always requires even more government intervention to correct past mistakes.

The central bank of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) would be well advised to just let their currency freely float against the currencies of the world.

This would mean the PRC’s official currency the renminbi or RMB and its unit of currency the yuan would rise in value against both the U.S. dollar and the Euro.

Yes, this would mean the PRC’s export goods would be more expensive for both Americans and Europeans and conversely American and European goods and services would be cheaper to purchase for the PRC.

The result would be a decline in the growth of exports to the United States and Europe.

The Chinese people need to be able to increase their level of consumption and reduce their savings rate to absorb the production that currently goes almost entirely abroad as exports.

Should the PRC implement such a strategy, it would be advised to stop purchasing United States Treasury debt and as the U.S Treasury obligations mature use the dollar payments to purchase natural resource assets in the United States.

In other words diversify your portfolio out foreign government obligations into natural resources that your economy needs to manufacture goods.

As a second best solution, gradually appreciate the renminbi against the U.S. dollar at 10% per year for five years and then freely float the yuan.

Since the U.S unemployment rate is expected to exceed 8% for at least the next three years, the appreciation of the renminbi at 10% a year for five years would lead to a decline in U.S. unemployment due to increase in U.S. exports and and a rise in the demand for Chinese exports as the U.S economy recovers from the recession.

Absence an improvement in the U.S. employment situation, demand for Chinese exports would be flat or even decline.

Therefore, it is in the interest of both countries governments to have an appreciation of the renminbi.

The U.S. Federal Reserve should also abandon its practice of intervening in the U.S money market by attempting to set target Federal fund rates to expand the money supply and in turn credit.

Will any of the above actually happen?

Not likely.

The ruling classes of United States and the People’s Republic of China actually believe they are have the intelligence and knowledge exceeding that of free markets.

Both ruling classes are only fooling themselves.

Both are wrong.

Let the currency wars begin.

Let the ruling class of both parties demonstrate they care less for the welfare of their people.

Let the American and Chinese people determine the fates of their ruling class.

Increasing unemployment in both countries will lead to a revolution and the overthrow of both ruling classes.

The free market will over time prevail and the ruling class control freaks with their failed government interventionist economic policies will be replaced.

Power of the Market – How to Cure Inflation 1

Power of the Market – How to Cure Inflation 2

Power of the Market – How to Cure Inflation 3

“We shall not grow wiser before we learn that much that we have done was very foolish. “

~Friedrich A. Hayek

“Perpetual vigilance on the part of the citizens can achieve what a thousand laws and dozens of alphabetical bureaus with hordes of employees never have and never will achieve: the preservation of a sound currency.”

~Ludwig von Mises, The Theory of Money and Credit, page 495

Background Articles and Videos

China’s Economy in the Post-Crisis World

Obama Pressed On New Global Currency At Presidential News Conference

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Chinese Communist State Company–China National Offshore Oil Corp.(CNOOC)–Invests In Texas Oil–Videos

Printing More Money (Quantitative Easing) and The Coming Currency War and Decline In The Purchasing Power of The U.S. Dollar–Robbing The American People–Videos

The Monetarization of The Debt and Quantitative Easing: The Federal Reserve is printing $1,000,000,000,000!–Run-Away Inflation Coming Soon!

 

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Producing Dialogue–Videos

Posted on October 15, 2010. Filed under: Audio, Microphones, Radio, Sound, Speech | Tags: , , , , , , |

ADR. What is ADR? Automated Dialogue Replacement

Automated Dialogue Replacement

EXTRAORDINARY Webdoc 10: POSTPRODUCTION – ADR Voice Overs

Post Synchronization

1. Influences of nonverbal speech on meaning include accent, pace, patterns, emphasis, inflection and mood.

2. The principal challenge during production is recording dialogue that is clear, intelligible, and as noise-free as possible.

3. Dramatizations on radio involve creating a “theater of the mind,” using sound to impel the listener to “see” the action.

4. To create perspective using one microphone n radio dramatization, performers are positioned at appropriate distances relative to the mic and to one another, as the dramatic action dictates.

5. Using the multimicrophone technique in radio dramatization, perspective is created in the postproduction mix.

6. For stereo radio dramatizations, coincident or near-coincident microphone arrays are usually employed. Coincident miking positions two microphones, usually directional (or s stereo mic), in virtually the same space, with their diaphragms located vertically on the same axis. Near-coincident miking positions two mics, usually directional, horizontally on the same plane, angled a few inches apart.

7. A main difference and advantages of surround-sound miking radio dramatizations is being able to position performers much as they would be on a stage and recording them from those perspectives or recording them conventionally and creating those perspectives in postproduction.

8. Recording dialogue on the set of a multi- or single-camera production usually means employing a boom, body-mounted wireless, or plant microphone, or a combination of the three. The microphones of choice are usually the mini- and shotgun capacitor mics.

9. The main sonic difference between the boom and body-mounted microphones is perspective. The boom better reproduces the mic-to-source distances that are relative to the shots’ fields of view. This helps maintain acoustic perspective between sound and picture. on the other hand, the body-mounted mic always picks up dialogue that is clear and present with a minimum of background sound, but sonic perspective remains the same regardless of a shot’s focal length.

10. Miking decisions are made in preproduction planning during blocking, when the movements of performers and cameras are worked out.

11. The challenge in operating a boom is to maintain aural perspective while simultaneously keeping the performers in the mic’s pickup pattern and, of course, the mic out of the frame.

12. Care must be taken when using a body mic to ensure that it is inconspicuous and that it does not pick up the sound of clothes rustling. Cotton does not make as much rustling sound as do synthetic fabrics.

13. Plant, or fixed, microphones are positioned around a set to cover action that cannot easily be picked up with a boom or body mic.

14. Preproduction planning is essential in any production, but especially so when working in the field, away from security and resources of the studio. Preproduction planning involves selecting a location; determining how to deal with unwanted sound; preparing, in advance, prerecorded material; and anticipating all the main and backup equipment needs.

15. In production, recording the clearest, most intelligible noise-free dialogue is the primary challenge of the production recordist, regardless of a director’s intention to use it or redo it in postproduction.

16. Dealing with unwanted sound on the set is an ever-present challenge to the audio crew. But being aware of problems is not enough–ou have to know what, if anything, to do about them.

17. Be wary of employing signal processing during production recording. It affects the dialogue audio throughout postproduction.

18. The value of noise reduction throughout the production process cannot be overemphasized, especially in relation to dialogue and field recording.

19. If the director enlightens the entire picture-producing team on how to avoid or minimize audio problems, it goes a long way toward audio efficiency and economy, not only in production but in postproduction as well.

20. Production recordists can be of considerable help in giving sound editors flexibility by how they record dialogue on the set.

21. In automated dialogue replacement, dialogue is recorded or rerecorded in postproduction so there is complete control over the acoustic environment in which the dialogue sits. Any background sound, ambience, or sound effects are added to the dialogue track(s) later.

22. ADR is done in a dialogue recording studio, a relatively dry room with a screen and a microphone.

23. ADR frees picture from sound and gives the director more flexibility and control. On the other hand, it involves re-creating a performance, which is not as natural or as authentic as the real thing.

24. The five elements generally considered to be most important in ADR are pitch, tone, rhythm, emotion, and syn.

25. In scenes calling fo background voices, called walla, loop groups are used.

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Producing Talk And Voice-Overs–Videos

Posted on October 15, 2010. Filed under: Acoustics, Audio, Communications, Digital Communication, Loudspeakers, Radio, Recordings, Sound, Speech, Television | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

How to Set Up PA Systems : Basic Microphone Placement for PA System Setup

School radio studio tour

How a Radio Station Works : Radio DJ Microphone Placement

Audio-Technica Studio Recording Microphones w/ AVGIANT at NAMM

1. The production chain (in non-music production) generally begins with the talking performer and therefore involves considerations that relate to producing speech.

2. How speech is produced depends on (1) the type of program or production; (2) the medium–radio, TV, film–and, in TV and film, whether the production technique is single– or multicamera; (3) whether it is done in the studio ori n the field; and (4) whether it is live, live-on-tape, or produced for later release.

3. The frequency range of the human voice is not wide compared with that of other instruments. The adult male’s fundamental voicing frequencies are from roughly 80 to 240 Hz; for the adult female, they are from roughly 140 to 500 Hz. Harmonics and overtones carry theses ranges somewhat higher. (Ranges for the singing voice are significantly wider).

4. Speech intelligibilty is at a maximum when levels are about 70 to 90 dB-SP. Certain frequencies, particularly in the midrange, are also more critical to speech intelligibility than others.

5. Acoustical phase refers to the time relationship between two (or more) sound waves at a given point in their cycles. Electrical phase refers to the relative electrical polarity of two signals n the same circuit. When these waves or polarities are in phase–roughly coincident in time–their amplitudes are additive. When these waves or polarities are out of phase–not coincident in time–their amplitudes are reduced.

6. Evaluation of a microphone for speech includes at least four criteria: clarity, presence, richness, and versatility.

7. The closer a microphone is placed to a sound sources, the closer to the audience the sound source is perceived to be and the warmer, denser, bassier, drier, more intimate, and more detailed is the perceived sound.

8. The farther a microphone is placed from a sound source, the farther from the audience the sound source is perceived to be and the more distant, diffused, open, spacious, reverberant, and detached, and the less detailed is the perceived sound.

9. In selecting and positioning a mic, keep excessive sound that is reflected from room surfaces, furniture, and equipment from reaching the mic, or comb filtering can result. Choose a mic and position it to avoid sibilance, plosives, and breath sounds.

10. In monaural sound aural space is one-dimensional–measured in terms of depth–so perspective is near-to-far.

11. In stereo sound aural space is two-dimensional–measured in terms of depth and breadth–so perspectives are near-to-far and side-t0-side.

12. In stereo miking the angle or distance between the two microphones (or microphone capsules) determines side-to-side perspective. The smaller the angle or distance between the mics, the narrower the left-to-right stereo image; the larger the angle or distance, the wider the left-to-right image.

13. In disc jockey, interview, and panel programs, the participants should sound as though they are coming from the front and center of the aural space. With more than one participant, using individual microphones, the loudness levels for the participants must be similar if the sound is to be perceived as coming from the front and center of the aural space.

14. The overall sound of a radio station involves the particular music or talk format, the announcer’s delivery style, the production style of the spot announcements and jingles, and how tightly presented they all are.

15. The techniques used to mike speech for picture in television and film (and to produce sound, in general) may depend on whether the production is broadcast live, or live-on-tape, or is taped/filmed for showing at a later date.

16. In radio microphones can be placed anywhere without regard for appearance so long as the participants are comfortable and the mics do not get in their way. If the radio program is also televised, some care for appearance should be taken. In television, if a mic is in the picture, it should be good-looking and positioned so that it does not obscure the performer;s face. If it is not in the picture, it must be positioned close enough to the performer so that the sound is on-mic.

17. Generally, for optimal sound pickup the recommended placement for a mini-mic is in the area of the performer’s sternum, about 6 to 8 inches below the chin.

18. Hiding a mini-mic under clothing requires that the mic and mic cable are or can be made insensitive to rustling sounds and that the clothing be made of material that is less likely to make those sounds.

19. In television a desk mic is often used as a prop. If the desk mic is live, make sure it does not block the performer’s face, interfere with the performer’s frontal working space, pr pick up studio noises.

20.The handheld mic allows the host to control audience questioning and mic-to-source distance and, like the desk mic, helps generate a closer psychological rapport with the audience.

21. The boom microphone, like the mini-mic hidden under clothing, is used when mics must be out of the picture. Often one boom mic covers more than one performer. To provide adequate sound pickup, and to move the boom at the right time to the right place, the boom operator must anticipate when one performer is about to stop talking and another is to start.

22. Different techniques are used in controlling levels, leakage, and feedback of mic feeds from multiple sound sources: following the three-t0-one rule, moderate limiting or compression noise gating, or using an automatic microphone mixer.

23. If an audience is present, it must be miked to achieve an overall sound blend and to prevent one voice or group of voices from predominating.

24. Increasing audience laugher or applause, or both, by using recorded laugher or applause tracks adds to a program’s spontaneity and excitement.

25. Recording speech begins with good acoustics. Mediocre acoustics can make speech sound boxy, oppressive, lifeless, ringy, or hollow.

26. Recording speech generally involves either the voiceover–recording copy to which other sonic material is added–or dialogue. Voice-over material includes short-form material, such as spot announcements, and long-form material, such as documentaries and audiobooks.

27. Recording a solo performer and a microphone is a considerable challenge: there is no place to hide.

28. Among the things to avoid in recording speech are plosives, sibilance, breathiness, and tongue and lip smacks.

29. Three types of narration are direct, indirect, and contrapuntal.

30. It is often not so much what is said, but how is said that conveys the overall meaning of a message.

31. Voice acting involves “taking the words off the page” and making them believable and memorable.

32. Among the considerations a voice actor comes to grips with in bringing the appropriate delivery to copy are voice quality, message, audience, word values, and character.

33. Studio intercommunication systems are vital in coordinating the functions of the production team. Three types of studio intercom systems are the private line or phone line–PL; studio address–SA: and interruptible foldback–IFB.

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Synchronization And Transfers–Videos

Posted on October 8, 2010. Filed under: Audio, Law, Radio, Recordings, Sound, Sound Effects, Speech, Synchronization, Web | Tags: , , , , , , |

 

Midi Time Code & SMPTE Synchronization for Midi Composers

How to Synchronize Audio and Video

How to Make a Good Basic YouTube Video

Cheap Wireless Radio Mics From eBay – any good?

Radio Mics & Alternatives for Low Budget Filmmaking?

Main Points To Remember

1. Synchronization allows the locking of two or more devices that have microprocessor intelligence so that they operate at precisely the same rate.

2. Accurate synchronization requires a system to code the recording media as well as a synchronizer to read the codes, compare them, and adjust the positions and speeds of machine transports so that they run at exactly the same rate.

3. There are three basic time codes: longitudinal time code and vertical interval time code, both of which are forms of  SMPTE time code; MIDI time codes; and the IEC standard.

4. SMPTE time code is a high-frequency electronic digital signal consisting of a stream of pulses produced by a time code generator. Its identifying code numbers are broken down into hours, minutes, seconds, and frames.

5. SMPTE longitudinal time code (LTC) is a digital signal converted to audio frequencies so it can be recorded on an audio track.

6. Vertical interval time code (VITC) carries the same information as SMPTE code, but it is used with video-tape and encodes the information vertically within the video signal, outside the visible picture area.

7. MIDI time code (MTC) translates SMPTE time code into MIDI messages.

8. The IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) standard is the time code system used in digital audio-cassette recorders to ensure compatibility among all R-DAT equipment.

9. Because all time code readouts are in the same form, it is easy to confuse them if any numbers are duplicated on the same tape or on multiple tapes in a production. Two ways to avoid this confusion are to use the zero-start or the time-of-day logging method.

10. In recording SMPTE time code, be careful to record it at the recommended level. It the signal is recorded at too low a level, synchronization is adversely affected. If it is recorded  at too high a level, the time code signal will distort.

11. Every digital audio system has a signal, known as a word clock, generated inside the device that controls sampling frequency, or sampling rate. With digital audio, sampling rate is the determining syn factor.

12. A degradation in word-clock signals among the digital devices being interfaced can create jitter–a variation in time from sample to sample that causes changes in the shape of the audio waveform.

13. Five frame rate standards are used within SMPTE time code: 23.976, 24, 25, 29.97, and 30 frames per second (fps).

14. Frame rates for television are in either drop frame or non-drop frame format. Drop frame time code is time-accurate because it makes up for the error that results from the difference between the 29.97-fps and the 30-fps rate of video. Non-drop frame is the original video time code calculated at 30 fps. The two modes are not interchangeable.

15. In double-system recording, sound and picture are recorded separately and in syn; the camera records the picture, and an audio recorder handles the sound.

16. In single-system recording, both sound and picture are recorded on the same medium.

17. Two methods used to synchronize the film camera and the audio recorder in double-system recording are crystal synchronization and time code synchronization.

18. In double-system recording, a clapslate is used to make a visible and an audible syn mark on the film and audio recording, respectively. This helps identify and synchronize scenes during their transfer from the audio recoding to magnetic film, or more common, hard disk, and in editing.

19. Time code permits the accurate interlocking of two or more recorders, but a synchronizer is necessary to ensure that their transports run together simultaneously.

20. Copying sound (or picture) from one audio film or video device to another is usually called a transfer. Dub is another often-used term to describe this process.

21. Common audio transfers are analog to analog, analog to digital, and digital to digital.

22. In transferring audio, the sound can be altered for special effects.

23. The process of transferring a double-system film recording for postproduction to align the audio and the film is called resolving.

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Sound Design–Videos

Posted on October 8, 2010. Filed under: Audio, Communications, Digital Communication, Movies, Music, Radio, Recordings, Sound Effects, Speech | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

WALL-E Special Features Animation Sound Design: Building Worlds From The Sound Up (Part 1)

WALL-E Special Features Animation Sound Design: Building Worlds From The Sound Up (Part 2)

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 1 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 2 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 3 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 4 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 5 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 6 of 7

Sound Design for King Kong (Post/production) 7 of 7

A Tour of LA’s Village Recording Studio

Deep Recording Studios – The Tour

Deep Studios Industry Training – Sound Engineering

Main Points To Remember

1. Sound design is the process of creating the overall sonic character of a production and is ongoing throughout the production process.

2. The sound designer is responsible for creative control of the audio–to put a coherent sonic stamp on a production–although all members of the audio team make creative contributions to the sound.

3. There are three domains to work with in creating a sound design: speech, sound effects, and music. Paradoxically, silence and the ability of sound to evoke a picture in the mind’s eye may be considered two other domains.

4. All sound is made up of the same basic components: pitch, loudness, timbre, tempo, rhythm, attack, duration, and decay.

5. Sound also has a visual component in that it can create pictures in the “theater of the mind.”

6. Sound has several functions in relation to picture; Sound can parallel picture, sound can define picture, picture can define sound and picture can define effect, and sound can counterpoint picture.

7. There  is no set procedure for designing sound. At the outset the most important thing to do is study the script and analyze the auditory requirements line by line to determine the overall sonic approach to various scenes or for an entire work, or both.

8. Determining a sound design involves consideration of how the audience is to think or feel about a particular story, scene, character, or action; from what point of view; and whether that is to be carried out mainly in the sound effects or music or both.

9. Determining a sound design also requires the awareness that doing so is often tantamount to defining a production’s conceptual and emotional intent.

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